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Find tips and ways to make Tummy Time more fun for baby!

Infantino Peek and Play Tummy Time Activity Mat

$22.99


3. Trust your mummy instincts there are no prizes in tummy time!

Then, when my son was two and a half months old, I started taking him to a parent/infant education class offered through our local community college taught by child development specialist Laura Sobell (learn more about Laura and her amazing work at ). I am so thankful for everything I learned in that class, especially when it came to helping my little one actually enjoy tummy time! Who would’ve thought? Some of what you will find below is inspired by what I learned in that class. However, the majority of the details and graded progression from beginning to end are taken from my own experience as both a parent and a therapist.

Then, when my son was two and a half months old, I started taking him to a parent/infant education class offered through our local community college taught by child development specialist Laura Sobell (learn more about Laura and her amazing work at ). I am so thankful for everything I learned in that class, especially when it came to helping my little one actually enjoy tummy time! Who would’ve thought? Some of what you will find below is inspired by what I learned in that class. However, the majority of the details and graded progression from beginning to end are taken from my own experience as both a parent and a therapist.

Some of the benefits of Tummy Time are:

Picture 1 - Tummy time on Mom's chest.

Great suggestions for babies who hate tummy time!

1. Baby is held up to adult’s shoulder while being burped or carried.
This is, of course, one of the most common first positions in which people hold babies so, CONGRATS! If you’re reading this post then you’ve likely already accomplished step one. This really is the first step to helping a baby learn to be comfortable in prone. The higher up on your shoulder you hold the baby, the more strength required to keep that head up and steady. While carrying baby up on your shoulder does not fit the (and should not be considered a replacement for tummy time), it’s a great first step in helping baby ease into working on head control, in the context of the bigger picture.

Many sources I’ve read seem to recommend that parents try to give their babies about 30-60 minutes of tummy time each day, whether that’s in one chunk or spread throughout the day in much smaller portions. Pediatric physical therapist states that by about 3 months of age, babies should get at least 90 minutes a day of tummy time. that, at four months of age, babies who spend at least 80 minutes per day playing on their tummy while awake are able to more successfully reach motor milestones involving the prone, supine (laying on the back), and sitting positions than those who spend less time playing on their tummy. Although 80-90 minutes sounds like a lot, it’s really not very much time throughout the course of a day, if you think about it! However, rather than shooting for a concrete number of minutes spent forcing your baby to lie flat on the ground (which will likely end with crying and screaming, like it did with mine), your baby can instead proceed through the steps listed below in order to build up the strength and stamina needed to be able to independently lay and play on her tummy and actually enjoy it!